Washington DC Northwest

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Washington DC NorthWest

One of the city’s first all-black neighborhoods was in the section of Washington DC Northwest, often known as Uptown.

Many blacks began living in small communities known as the Alley Dwellings, but the neighborhood of Shaw was the largest and most historic community of the Washington DC Northwest.

washington dc northwest

The Shaw community was at one time the center of all black culture in Washington DC, which was a successful community as early as the late 1800s or the early 1900s, with a number of public places and institutions and businesses that was strictly for Washington D.C.’s black population.

One of the city’s most famous and historic districts was the U Street area, located around the Shaw community from NW 9th Street to NW 18th Street, known for being home to entertainment and a large number of businesses.

Other historic communities of Northwest D.C. were neighborhoods like Columbia Heights, LeDroit Park, the location of Howard University, and a few others.

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After the Martin Luther King assassination in the late 1960s, the neighborhood changed from being a thriving business and culture district to public officials naming the community as one of the most crime infested areas in the city.

washington dc northwest

640 Park Morton

When the streets became active, beginning mostly in the late 1980s, the Washington DC Northwest section or the Uptown area was well known for the legendary Hanover Place, the nearby Sursum Corda and now demolished Temple Court, as well a number of blocks off of First Street or in the Shaw neighborhood.

Other parts of the Northwest are apartment complexes like 640 Park Morton, Kennedy Park (KDP), the old CTU (Clifton Terrace), or blocks as far north as Kennedy Street (KDY).

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Since the days before the 2000s, the Washington DC Northwest neighborhoods have been the city’s most sought after communities by developers and real estate companies.

washington dc northwest

Beginning in places like Columbia Heights or Adams Morgan, gentrification has been claiming much of the neighborhood, from the once famous U Street to neighborhoods along Georgia Ave.

These once predominantly black communities, that did thrive at one time and declined around the 1960s and 1970s, are becoming filled with luxury homes and businesses with real estate companies buying properties throughout the area, leading to evictions or the force of relocating into the South Side (Southeast DC) or in Maryland, due to the increasing property values.

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Check out more on Washington D.C. from TheRealStreetz.com

All information is provided through people of the community, outside sources, and research.  Some information might not be current and/or 100% accurate.

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